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man in suit illustrating article about low stress jobs after retirement

There is no mandatory retirement age in the United Kingdom, although the State Pension age is 66 for men as well as women. Regardless of whether you retire at this age or before then, there are a myriad of reasons as to why you might consider working after you have officially retired.

It may be that you want to supplement your pension, gradually step back from work rather than stopping abruptly, or you want to remain as engaged and as active as possible. Whatever your motivations may be, we have created a list of low-stress semi-retirement jobs which are perfect if you have no desire to retire in the traditional sense.

In this article, we'll find out...

Low Stress Jobs After Retirement

1. Tutoring

Anyone who has retired has decades of experience behind them, and tutoring is an excellent way for you to impart your knowledge and expertise to other people. If you previously worked in a specialised field, especially in teaching, then you could consider becoming a private tutor for primary school, secondary school and university students.

One of the main advantages of tutoring is that the schedules are quite flexible and you can decide how much work you want to take on. You can choose to promote your services through word of mouth, or you can alternatively use an online tutoring website which will delegate students to you. The average salary for a tutor is around £20 per hour, although it can be more depending on your experience and speciality.

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2. Airbnb Host

If privacy and quiet is important to you, then this probably won’t be the job for you. If you don’t mind the thought of having some more company around the house, however, then hosting an Airbnb is an excellent option. It is as simple as creating a listing on the Airbnb website, and you can individually approve potential guests before they make a booking with you.

Becoming an Airbnb host is an ideal choice for retirees because all that is required of you is to manage your home, communicate with guests, and then clean up once they have left. It is a flexible source of income, and the average host earns around £3,000 per year. Of course, it is up to you whether you want to rent out a single room or an entire house if you happen to have a rental property.

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3. Librarian or Library Assistant

Becoming a librarian or a library assistant is any book lover’s dream, and it is the perfect occupation for a retiree who wants to continue working in a peaceful environment. Some of the responsibilities which will be expected of you include ordering various books and journals, cataloguing library materials, offering advice to users as well as organising staff and budgets.

It will also be a wonderful opportunity for you to socialise and interact with people who are as passionate about reading as you are. It is always worth seeing if your local library, school and university libraries and even book stores have any vacancies. The average salary for a librarian in the United Kingdom is approximately £26,700 per year, and it can be more if you are in a more senior position.

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4. Editor

Editing articles, books and publications is a low-stress and potentially lucrative job for retirees to pursue. If you are good with language, have a strong grasp of grammar and a keen eye for detail, then editing will probably be one of the easiest jobs to get. It’s up to you whether you want to edit on a freelance basis or work for a company, although if you want consistent work and income then the latter is probably the better option.

As an editor, you will typically create interesting and engaging content, pursue new ideas and unique perspectives, as well as work either individually or with a team to find sources and ensure that everything is of a publishable standard. The average annual income for an editor is in the region of £30,000, although there is scope for higher earnings if you have prior experience in the field or a specialism in a certain subject.

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5. Pet Sitting

When it comes to fun jobs, almost nothing compares to working with animals. If you have always loved animals, then becoming a pet sitter, pet boarder or a pet walker is just what you have been looking for. Evidently, it would certainly help if you currently have or have had pets in the past or experience with animals in general. You can either offer services to your friends and neighbours, or register with an online website where people can approach you themselves for your services.

You will have the opportunity to spend your day with delightful furry companions, whilst being paid at the same time. It will also be a great excuse for you to leave the house and get some exercise, as well as meeting with other animal-lovers and like-minded people. The average pet sitter can earn between £10 and £15 an hour, and if you do this on a regular basis then it can be a considerable source of supplemental income.

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6. Blogging

The flexibility and autonomy which is offered by blogging is unparalleled. If you have just retired, it is definitely a worthwhile option to consider because of the potential it has to become a reliable source of passive income. What’s more, blogging can accommodate any passion or interest that you have, and even if you don’t have a particular focus in mind you can always use it as a journal or diary filled with your reflections and thoughts. As long as you regularly update your blog and make it as engaging as possible, you should be able to build up an audience of loyal readers.

Overtime, you can start to monetize your blog in several ways such as by displaying advertisements with companies such as Google Adsense, earning affiliate income by providing links to certain products and services, or with sponsored posts and brand deals. There is a huge variability in how much bloggers can earn, but once you have established your blog you can expect it to bring you at least several hundred pounds every month.

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7. Small Business Owner

You might have a skill which you have honed to perfection during your decades of working, or a hobby and passion which you have never had the opportunity to pursue. After retirement is the perfect time for you to chase those dreams and aspirations which you may have had to place on the sidelines when you worked full-time. You might have an interest in baking, painting, writing short stories, embroidery, inventing, podcasting, crafting, woodwork, jewellery-making or anything else.

Whatever it may be, starting a small business is a great way for you to dedicate yourself to your hobbies and passions whilst also earning from them at the same time. You can either advertise yourself through word of mouth or on social media, or you can enlist in the services of an online platform such as Etsy, Amazon or eBay. On average, the annual salary for a small business owner is around £30,000.

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Summary

When your time as a permanent worker has come to an end, it heralds the beginning of an exciting stage in your life. Your retirement is the opportunity you have been waiting for to finally change career paths and pursue your passions and dreams. A career change at 50, 60 or 70 doesn’t have to be a daunting or frightening prospect.

The jobs we have listed in this article are low stress, making your transition into a post-retirement life as easy as possible whilst also ensuring that you can continue to engage with others, remain active, and seek fulfilment and meaning in whatever you do. There’s truly an option for everyone, and it’s just about taking that first step and realising that there are so many opportunities which are you are yet to avail.


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